September 26, 2016

Homosexuality: What the World Promotes, God Condemns

Randolph Shaylor

One of the greatest problems facing contemporary American culture and Biblical Christianity is the pressure to accept homosexuality and same-sex marriage as the moral equivalent of heterosexuality and Biblical marriage. Today’s Christians face misinterpretation, twisting, and perversions of Scripture: God created homosexuals; they are born that way and cannot change; the sin of Sodom was not homosexuality but inhospitality; Old Testament condemnations refer only to cultic worship and male prostitution; Jesus did not condemn homosexuality; the most important teaching in the New Testament is love; Biblical prohibitions do not refer to homosexuals in committed monogamous relationships; attempts to change will ultimately fail. Liberal theologians and clergy join homosexuals in demanding that society and churches accept them and their behavior as normal. The ultimate pressure is to have any negative statements about homosexuality, even the reading of Bible passages, branded as hate crimes.

[Read More…]

Comments on Baptist Fundamentals: Fidelity to Our Baptist Heritage

Don Johnson

Our latest installment from Baptist Fundamentals came in two parts over the last two days. The message was by Thomas Jefferson Villers, then pastor of First Baptist Church, Detroit, Michigan. His message could be characterized as more “devotional” in quality, as opposed to the “argumentative” one might expect at an inaugural fundamentalist conference. Yet there are points where he clearly calls Baptist believers to fidelity to the old paths.

[Read More…]

Baptist Fundamentals: Fidelity to Our Baptist Heritage (2)

Thomas Jefferson Villers, D. D., LL. D.

Pastor First Baptist Church, Detroit, Mich.

Editorial note: We are in the midst of a series of posts from the messages delivered at the Pre-Convention Conference of the Northern Baptist Convention, 1920. From the Conference the Fundamental Fellowship was formed which is today known as the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International. The messages from the conference were published in a book called Baptist Fundamentals. The book has been digitized by Maranatha Baptist University and is available as part of the Roger Williams Heritage Archives collection in Logos format, available here. Links to previous posts will appear at the end of this post.

Our current offering comes in two parts, with commentary the next day. Part One covered a fairly typical recitation of Baptist martyrology, a topic that reminds of the sacrifice made in behalf of the heritage of soul-liberty, which blesses men of all beliefs with freedom of religion where the principles are enshrined into law. Today’s offering, Part Two, rehearses the heritage of a spiritual membership, and cultural achievements, along with an evangelistic fervor which make faithful Baptist views worth striving for.

With our heritage of soul-liberty has come that of a spiritual church. Our fathers bequeathed to us the conviction that the church is a body of believers called out from the world, that the membership is a regenerate membership, consisting of such only as have been renewed by God’s Spirit and are by faith vitally joined to Christ. They could not, therefore, accept the Westminster Confession, which affirms that the church includes all those throughout the world who profess the true religion, together with their children. Nor could they assent to the Book of Common Prayer, from which the minister, at the christening of an unconscious babe, reads, saying, “This child is regenerate and grafted into the body of Christ’s church.” Our fathers held that the reason for our denominational existence is not baptism as a mode, but the church as a spiritual organism. They practised immersion not simply because Christ was buried beneath the yielding wave, but because immersion is “our Lord’s appointed sign of his death and resurrection, and of the believer’s entrance into communion therewith.” They rejected infant baptism not simply because it has no scriptural warrant, but because it admits to the church such as do not know and cannot know aught of the new birth. They opposed sprinkling or pouring in the case of adults not simply because no such method was known in apostolic days, but because the ordinance when thus administered does not symbolize that dying and rising with Christ which is essential to admission into a New Testament church. [Read More…]

Baptist Fundamentals: Fidelity to Our Baptist Heritage (1)

Thomas Jefferson Villers, D. D., LL. D.

Pastor First Baptist Church, Detroit, Mich.

Editorial note: We are in the midst of a series of posts from the messages delivered at the Pre-Convention Conference of the Northern Baptist Convention, 1920. From the Conference the Fundamental Fellowship was formed which is today known as the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship International. The messages from the conference were published in a book called Baptist Fundamentals. The book has been digitized by Maranatha Baptist University and is available as part of the Roger Williams Heritage Archives collection in Logos format, available here. Links to previous posts will appear at the end of this post.

Our current offering will have to come in two parts, with commentary the next day. The two parts are fairly lengthy in themselves. Part One covers a fairly typical recitation of Baptist martyrology, a topic that reminds of the sacrifice made in behalf of the heritage of soul-liberty, which blesses men of all beliefs with freedom of religion where the principles are enshrined into law. The history calls for personal loyalty to the faith that first championed it among the people of the world.

Artemus Ward[1] used to talk about the time when the Mayflowers came over in the Pilgrim and brought Plymouth Rock with ’em. When that frail craft dropped anchor off New England, she carried a cargo more enduring than stone and more precious than gold. “She was freighted with principles, convictions, institutions, and laws.” Her passengers were few; but they were tall men, sun-crowned. In all that constitutes true soul-greatness, despite their poverty of purse, they matched our high mountains and broad plains. They were men with empires in their bosoms and new eras in their brains.

[Read More…]

  1. nom de plume of Charles Farrar Browne, 1834-1867, early American humorist []

Singing (Part 2)

George Stiekes

[See here for Part 1]

I will praise Thee, O LORD, with my whole heart; I will show forth all Thy marvelous works. I will be glad and rejoice in Thee: I will sing praise to Thy name, O Thou most High. Psalm 9:1-2

In Part 1, it was noted that singing is a very vital part of worship — personally and corporately. The psalmist sang, praising God with his WHOLE HEART — with exuberant feelings emphasizing the involvement of the will, intellect and emotions.

[Read More…]

Archives of all posts here